THE PERRYMAN RANCH
Mail: 9521B Riverside Pkwy, # 358
Tulsa, Oklahoma 74137
(918) 298-2300 Fax: Toll Free 1-866-442-1846

E-mail: info@perrymanranch.com

 
Ranch Entrance
Original sweetwater well at the Ranch
The longhorn cattle on the ranch are descendants of the Perryman's original herd, driven from the Florida Panhandle in the 1830's.
Longhorn Cattle
AUCTION AT RANCH PAVILION
Front Porch - Homestead's 100th Birthday
DREAM KEEPERS AWARDS
HONOR MONETTA TREPP
FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT

Wally Trepp, Tom Trepp
Monetta Trepp was posthumously honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award at the annual Dream Keepers Banquet (Greater Tulsa Indian Affairs Commission & City of Tulsa) on November 4, 2013. The Commission also presented a Proclamation in her memory to the Trepp family.

The annual Dream Keeper Awards Banquet celebrates Native American leaders in our community who exemplify strong character and have made a difference through solid dedication to public service.

PROCLAMATION IN MEMORY OF

MONETTA J. TREPP

 

WHEREAS, Monetta J. Trepp, Muscogee (Creek) citizen, helped establish and sustain the Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission in the City of Tulsa and Tulsa County and today is one of the most vibrant Indian Affairs Commissions in the state of Oklahoma to support and represent the American Indian population and to honor American Indian heritage; and


WHEREAS, Monetta was an integral board member of the Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission, on which she chaired many events and also served as an officer; and

WHEREAS, Monetta was an advocate of American Indian culture and was a patron and mentor to the American Indian community throughout the years; and

 

WHEREAS, Monetta’s family, the Perrymans, played a pivotal role in establishing and settling the City of Tulsa and Monetta’s great-grandfather, George Perryman signed the original town charter in 1898; and

WHEREAS, Monetta was co-founder of the annual Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival, to promote and preserve Native American art and culture, and today the festival holds one of the nation’s most prominent juried Native art competitions; and

 

WHEREAS, Monetta was the founder of the National Indian Monument and Institute (NIMI), a non-profit organization created to honor, preserve, and celebrate the history, art, and culture of American Indians; and

WHEREAS, Monetta assisted in the selection of numerous recipients of the annual Greater Tulsa Indian Affairs Commission’s Dream Keepers Awards, which are awards honoring outstanding American Indians for their achievements and contributions that have enriched the lives of others; and

WHEREAS, Monetta was a tremendous asset and left an enduring legacy to the Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission;

NOW, THEREFORE, We the members of the Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission and City of Tulsa Human Rights Department do hereby express to her family our sincere appreciation of Monetta J. Trepp and her many contributions to the development and success of the Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission.

 

Signed by Dewey Bartlett, Mayor, City of Tulsa, November 4, 2013

 

 

TULSA CITY-COUNTY LIBRARY COMMISSION PRESENTS PROCLAMATION IN MEMORY OF MONETTA TREPP
l-r Rhiannan Trepp, Tom Trepp, Kay Trepp and grandchild; Wally Trepp, Judy Randle, Robert Trepp
On June 20, 2013, the Tulsa City-County Library Commission presented a Proclamation of Appreciation In Memory of Monetta Trepp to her family. Judy Randle, Commission Chair, officiated.

PROCLAMATION IN MEMORY OF
MONETTA TREPP


WHEREAS, Monetta Trepp helped establish Tulsa City-County Library’s American Indian Resource Center, which began in 1999 and today is one of only two centers in public libraries across the nation that provide cultural, educational and informational resources, activities and services highlighting American Indian heritage;

WHEREAS, Monetta was an integral member of the American Indian Resource Center Community Advisory Committee, on which she served for 12 years;

WHEREAS, Monetta served as a gateway to American Indian culture and the American Indian community and as an advisor to each resource center coordinator throughout the years;

WHEREAS, Monetta assisted in the selection of five recipients of the American Indian Festival of Words Writers Award, which is an award designed to recognize written contributions of outstanding American Indian authors, poets, journalists, film and stage scriptwriters, and the first and only award given by a public library to honor an American Indian writer;

WHEREAS, Monetta assisted in the selection of four recipients of the American Indian Circle of Honor Award, which is an award honoring an American Indian for his/her achievements and contributions that have enriched the lives of others;

WHEREAS, Monetta was a tremendous asset to the Tulsa City-County Library and the American Indian Resource Center;

We the members of the Tulsa City-County Library Commission and staff do hereby express to her family our sincere appreciation of Monetta Trepp and her many contributions to the development and success of the American Indian Resource Center.

Tulsa City-County Library Commission:
• Mayor Dewey Bartlett, Jr.
• Sally Frasier
• Reverend Wendell Hope, Sr.
• Karen Keith, County Commissioner
• Rebecca Marks
• Charles O. Meyers, Jr.
• William L. Peacher
• Judy Randle
• Cindy Vogel
• Richard D. White, Jr.
• La Verne Ford Wimberly, Ed.D.
Click for article about
The Legacy of Monetta Trepp
Country's Oldest
White Bison Passes Away


TULSA, Okla. – Perryman Ranch has announced that Yvnvssv Hetke, the oldest male white bison in North America, has died.  The announcement was delayed in order that the remains could be buried secretly to prevent theft.  Several Native elders visited the site following the burial.  He was found deep in the thicket at the west end of Perryman Ranch, near Coal Creek, the morning after the October full moon.  The veterinarian who was called in said he died of natural causes, apparently from old age.  In the wild, bison (American buffalo) live to be about 25 years old.

Yvnvssv Hetke is Mvskoke (Muscogee) for bison, white.  He was about 30 years old, and had lived on the Perryman Ranch 20 years along with the Ranch’s herd of longhorn cattle, descended from the original Perryman herd driven here from Alabama around 1830.  He was owned by Robert W. Trepp, Loca’pokv Mvskoke, and Martin R. Shackelford, Osage.  Shackelford passed away in 2006.  The Perryman Ranch is owned by brothers Robert Trepp, Wally Trepp and Tom Trepp.

Although he was known to eat almost anything he could reach, his favorite treats seemed to be apples, pears, and oranges, all of which he ate whole.  He was also known to keep company with his choice of “girlfriends” in the longhorn herd.  He was steered before the Ranch acquired him, and left no offspring.  He “escaped” the Ranch twice, once dragging 1/8 mile of barbed wire fence out to Elwood Ave. to lead the longhorns north, another time leading the herd west through the residential neighborhood toward US-75.

The Perryman Ranch preserves the 1910 ranch home of Rachel (Dot), Cozetta, and Edith, the daughters of Mose Perryman, and Alice and H. Dale, children of Lula Dunbar Perryman Jordan, as well as the 1898 barn and an even older sandstone root cellar.  80 acres of Mose Perryman’s allotment of Muscogee tribal lands are preserved by the Trepp brothers.